Archive for ‘Chrome’

March 21, 2014

Google Research fan behavior

Friendly!

I found a broken link. It was important, being the contact URL on Google Research’s official Twitter account! I told them about it. Google Research wasn’t aloof! I was thrilled.

An invitation to join Google+

Google Research finally joined Google+ in August 2012.

Google Buzz chat

Inviting Google Research to Google+

I tried to coax an earlier arrival in July 2011. Click on the image if you would like to read our conversation. I remember feeling bold, and daring!

Odds and Ends

Indirect Content Privacy Surveys: Measuring Privacy Without Asking About It, Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS), 2011.
Abstract (an excerpt that I extracted from the abstract, that is):

The emotional aspect of privacy makes it difficult to evaluate privacy concern. This effect may be partly responsible for the dramatic privacy concern ratings coming from recent surveys, ratings that often seem to be at odds with user behavior…

This is SO true! Dramatically vocalized privacy concerns are highly inconsistent with actual user behavior! The gist of the article was to figure out a way to get at people’s privacy concerns without asking about privacy directly. Merely broaching the subject tends to cause survey respondents to get skittish, thus impacting their answers.

The article DOI, full text, is in this Google Research post.  If that doesn’t work, try the corresponding entry via Google Research’s profile on Google Buzz. The post was active from June 2011 through January 2012. Good luck finding it now. It is accessible sometimes, but not consistently. Odd, no? Maybe not so odd, as Google Buzz was discontinued a few years ago. I miss it.

Chrome browser crash

I know and love that sad little face too.

Yes, he is a sad guy. When Chrome browser crashes, I don’t feel annoyed anymore, just disappointed.

September 15, 2011

Google Apps discontinues support for old web browsers

As of August 1, 2011, Google Apps will support modern browsers ONLY

Users of Firefox 3.5, IE7 and Safari 3 (and their predecessors) take note! Gmail, Google Calendar, Talk, Docs and Sites will not work correctly on these older versions. Eventually they will stop working at all if you do not upgrade your browser to a more up to date version.

What is a modern browser according to Google Apps?

For Google Apps, “modern browser” has two parts. “Modern” refers to current and prior major releases. Support will be maintained on a rolling basis going forward.

Opera browser

The second part is “browser”, specifically, one of the following:

  • Chrome
  • Firefox
  • Internet Explorer
  • Safari

Opera is conspicuously absent, which may irk some European users.

Web browser market share

The following is a chart of desktop browser usage rates. Data was provided by StatCounter.

Desktop browser usage, Oct 2010 - Sep 2011

Safari is twice as popular as Opera, though a 4.26% market share is small compared to the top three. Safari is part of the larger Apple product line. Maybe that is the justification for Google’s decision to include Safari but not Opera.

Conjecture

The modern browser support announcement was specifically for Google Apps, though it may include all Google accounts at some point. I am uncertain. Perhaps Opera is not as often used by Google Apps and enterprise customers as Safari?

May 12, 2011

Google users pressed into service in war against spam

Google (GOOG) recently made an official announcement offering a Personal Blocklist extension for Chrome browser users. I am weighted down with far too many Chrome browser extensions already, so I haven’t tested this one. Technology press coverage of the news slightly surprised me:

Google (GOOG) is concluding that if people are so up in arms about its declining search results, then it will let the masses get to work in helping refine its search technology…

Users to spot Spam Sites

Spam Protection Extension for Chrome browser

While amusing (I’ve supplemented my TechCrunch reading with GigaOM lately), it was more in line with what I expect from The Onion. Yet it is correct. The size and growth of the spam problem warrants this reaction from the press, as well as the public and many businesses. All express frustration with spam and electronic detritus.

Google is addressing spam with a two-pronged initiative, it seems to me. The Google War on Content Farms  of a few weeks earlier was directed at particularly spammy e-commerce merchants and services. The Personal Blocklist browser extension is the second part, and directed at e-commerce consumers and users in general.

Basic search

Search!

In a worst case scenario, this can be viewed as a sign that the internet will soon become almost unusable due to clutter from impenetrable volumes of advertisements and duplication of once original but now outdated content. That is the most generalized definition of spam. As a matter of quality control Google DOES need to provide meaningful resultswith a minimum of spam, to Google Search 2.0. users.

What can be done?

Is Google evil?

Is it Google’s fault? Is Google greedy and betraying the pubic’s best interests? No, not particularly.

Google is a publicly traded company, a business with stockholders. It is not a public utility. Google employees and Google operations are not funded by the taxpayers of any nation. It is very easy to forget that. The model of free online services is wonderful, and benefits everyone, everywhere, particularly in countries where what is considered a nominal cost in the U.S.A. would be prohibitively expensive. Much of the U.S. and global economy, as well as the public in general, are dependent upon free Google services to some degree. This is analogous to physical infrastructure. It is digital infrastructure.

Infrastructure is usually part of the public sector

In order to fund the model of free internet search, and free Google products, Google sells online advertising. And so the World Wide Web’s spam problem reduces in some part, though not entirely, to the principal agent problem. Moral hazard. Conflict of interest.

Avoidance of moral hazard is a major benefit of having a public sector, and government. When the public sector functions as it should, it reduces biased behavior due to profit-seeking and other motives.

The dilemma for Google as a company

Google needs the advertising revenue provided by AdSense customers (some of whom are the Content Farmers). That is why Google must offer a quality product to the public. Not because the public are Google customers. Google search is free of charge. While it may be unethical to sell a poor-quality product, there is no law against offering crummy goods and services free of charge. That happens all the time. No one wants something that is useless or gives much less value than an alternative provider.

Good corporate citizenship is a consideration, but only a minor one. Google must provide a quality product because the public’s use of free Google products drives revenue from customers. Google is obligated to:

  • Customers. Primary customers are advertisers and revenue-generating businesses, for-profit and otherwise
  • Employees. The people whose paycheck it provides for going to work every day

Remember though that the motivation for these obligations is that they may in turn give value to shareholders in the company itself.

The war against the Content Farmers is dangerous for Google. The Google anti-spam efforts must be targeted enough to cut spam and increase search user satisfaction while not alienating the source of funding that sustains Google and allows the company to offer services at all.

April 14, 2011

Quality-of-Life in the Chrome O/S Cloud

Google Web Toolkit (“GWT”) is a productivity tool for developers. It is a

development toolkit for building and optimizing complex browser-based applications. GWT is used by many products at Google, including Google AdWords and Orkut. It’s open source, completely free, and used by thousands of developers [worldwide].

What programming language would be the most accessible for Google Chrome O/S apps development?

These are the existing constraints:

  1. Android apps are coded in Java.
  2. Chrome browser apps are JavaScript.
  3. A Java programmer can use a web toolkit to “translate” Java into JavaScript.

However, it will be more difficult to go in the other direction. That is, a PHP programmer can create JavaScript apps for Chrome browser. But Android apps require knowledge of Java. This is the reverse of item 3 (above), and is much more challenging.
Perhaps there is a unified language for both scripting as well as programming the core functionality of the app?

Google Web Toolkit

GWT Logo

Google Web Toolkit does that!

GWT certainly lets you write Java apps, then compile them into JavaScript. And it might get even better!

How? With a consolidated toolkit, based on GWT. Such a consolidated toolkit could be used to write an Android app that also works on Chrome O/S as a web app, without the need for coding in Java, only in JavaScript

November 3, 2010

Rise of Chrome 2

UPDATE: Note that as of today 3 February 2011, Google has released version 9.0.

This chart covers Chrome Chrome browser through version 5,0.

I’d love to see this market share chart updated, once data is available for the more recent versions of Chrome browser (for web).

Google Chrome Browser growth

Google Chrome Browser increases market share with each successive release

via defunktion junktion.

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