Posts tagged ‘universal search’

December 9, 2011

Emotional response to Google search

Humorous representation of user perception of Google search engine results

Charting emotional response to results returned by Google search

Via UberHumor, When searching on Google.

A second source of fun came to my attention courtesy of web designer, developer, and past Google employee Ji Lee 이지별 and his rather agreeable website-portfolio, Please Enjoy. It is Goollery (not affiliated with Google):

Via Goollery not affiliated with Google
Google Map Points

a collection of awesome Google-related projects from people around the world

Typical features are entertaining anecdotes and items like this life-sized Google map marker photo and story.

It is worth mentioning that neither Mr. Ji Lee’s website, nor Goollery are thinly disguised marketing-fodder. Both sites are sharp-witted in tone at times. They do not hesitate to mention less-than-favorable Google corporate strategies and policies. Similarly, they acknowledge instances when competitors excelled, or customers were not well-served. Yet neither site is mean-spirited.

Today’s post includes one more item of Google fun. The following video is now featured on Goollery in the “Most Recent” section, EPIC Google Docs.

It is a delightful animation, about 1:30 mins duration.

This demo shows how you can make a Flash-like animated presentation by only using Google Docs, without using any animation software. The presentation consists of 450 pages and was created by 3 persons from 3 different locations in 3 days.

There may be some adult, or at least “over age 13″ type content in one or both sites. That is a standard for most sites though. Even The Federal Reserve Bank of New York website has that provision in the terms of service:

Eligibility …not intended for users under the age of 13. By using the Services, you warrant that you are at least 13 years of age.

* All content on the Fed’s site is 100% free for re-use, however. Well, mostly, as long as it doesn’t come from third parties. And isn’t re-posted for commercial purposes. Probably best to view the Fed’s TOS page just to be certain.

September 22, 2011

New Google domains

Google offers search on different regional domains, to give users the most locally relevant results.

These are two examples of regional domains

  • google.fr for France
  • google.dj for Djibouti

In March 2011, Google introduced two more domains, google.iq for Iraq and google.tn for Tunisia. This brings the count of local Google search domains, worldwide, to 184. According to the Official Google Arabia blog, 15 of these domains are now in Arab countries.

Coupon

Free search!

Curious to view the internet from the view point of these domains? Or any other Google local domain?

The GoogleSystem Blog gives a step-by-step explanation for changing Google’s search domain from the default associated with your physical location.

September 17, 2011

Google Plus impact on page rank

Controversy over the impact of Google Plus buttons on search engine page rank is the latest news story associated with Google’s recently introduced social network. Will it benefit large websites to the detriment of small or specialty sites, particularly blogs? Since Google page rank is part of the mysterious world of search engine optimization, speculation is plentiful.

I found this attractive rendering of a Google Plus button on the Flickr page of a Second Life resident.

Circle Me! on G+

The image was used as the illustration for a mysteriously de-listed Forbes article* about the effect of Google+ buttons on website page rank. The article URL was supposedly removed from Google search results. Based on the error returned when I checked just now, I think it is more likely that it was deleted by Forbes. Whether accidental or by intent wasn’t obvious to me.

Yet it is not easy for anyone, not even Google, to erase digital footprints. Alternative search engine Blekko has the article in cache. Publication date was 18 August 2011 (Forbes Online). I will amend this post with a cleaner URL for the web cached result from Blekko. The article didn’t seem objectionable to me, upon first glance. But I am not an SEO expert.

* Thanks and attribution given to a Google+ user discussion of 31 August 2011.

UPDATE

Here is the Blekko web cached URL: http://blekko-webcache.com/cache/http%3A%2F%2Fwww.forbes.com%2Fsites%2Fkashmirhill%2F2011%2F08%2F18%2Fstick-google-plus-buttons-on-your-pages-or-your-search-traffic-dies%2F

The author is Forbes staff writer Ms. Kashmir Hill. The article is time stamped 11:21 AM on August 18, 2011, Technology section. The title is Stick Google Plus Buttons On Your Pages, Or Your Search Traffic Dies. The content of the article is not as dire as the title. These are the salient points, and possibly cause for concern by any website involved in e-commerce, publisher or otherwise:

Though recommendations from contacts in your Google circles will be weighted more heavily, the number of “+1″s overall will now be a factor in search whether you’re part of Plus or not…. The Google guys explained how the new recommendation system will be a factor in search. “Universally, or just among Google Plus friends?” I asked. ‘Universal’ was the answer.

This was not surprising, but still unsavory:

Some traffic scammers are already onto this. Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic reports that SEO shops are already offering bushels of +1 votes for $9.99 a pop.

Ms. Hill then suggested that the Google+ buttons will benefit users of online services and those active in social media:

There are going to be lots of benefits to this… I just gave a hotel I liked in TownN a +1. Should I miss a Facebook status update from a friend going to TownN in the future asking for recommendations, this is a built-in back-up, so that this hotel will rise up in the search results should they Google “TownN hotels.” That’s pretty cool… And I can do that even though TownN doesn’t have a +1 on its page, since these buttons are also available from the main Google search page.

Additional web analytics information will be available to sites that include the Google+ button. But similarly, sites that choose not to place the +1 button on their pages will likely fare worse in search results than competitors who have included the button.

Is this a problem?

Facebook “Like” buttons have a similar impact, though not through Google search engine results directly.

What is the downside?

The Google Plus button is free to use, just like other social media services. There will be some work for the web maintenance staff, decisions about optimal placement. Page load speed? Uncertain. Yet it would be very unwise for Google to penalize sites in search results due to incremental delay from using one its own products! Overall, Google+ does not seem to be a cause for concern– merely the addition of another social media button to the already ubiquitous Facebook and Twitter icons.

March 12, 2011

How To Use Google To Search

Which search to use?

Google search

Which search to use?

Sounds obvious doesn’t it? It isn’t. As a start, consider these three search options of which I wasn’t aware.

Then there is the basic bread-and-butter of searches. I found the choice of search topic quite ironic.

How to use Google 2.0 universal search, the 2008 edition

universal search

Google 2.0 Universal Search

This detailed guide maintained by Google describing the meaning of each item returned on search results pages is a good resource.

Then there are the infrequently used special search commands. I wrote a detailed post on these Google special searches a few weeks ago.

See too the Google resource page of help documents to learn how to search.

Inspired by How To Use Google To Search.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.