Posts tagged ‘website’

March 12, 2011

War on Content Farms Now in Progress

Farmer's market, Jul 2009 - 01

Content fresh from the farm

Google Declares War on Content Farms:

Google has announced a major algorithmic change to its search engine. Impact on users will be subtle while dramatically improving the quality of Google’s search results…

Google is targeting content farms.

This update is designed to reduce rankings for low-quality sites — sites which copy content from other websites or sites that are just not very useful…. It will provide better rankings for sites with original content, such as research, in-depth reports, thoughtful analysis and so on.

The change should make it easier to find high quality sites.

Google did not give details of the change, which should impact 11.8% of Google’s queries (currently only in the U.S., with plans to roll it out elsewhere over time), but it does say that it will affect the ranking of many sites on the web.

The list of related articles I have hand selected (just like I dredge through string beans in order to find the very best ones) may be of further interest to those with a sense of humor. Or without a personal stake in content farming.

January 17, 2011

Google Buzz for users, web sites and developers

Logo by Google

Google Buzz Logo and Button

Help people share stuff from your website using Google Buzz! Google Buzz buttons are the easiest way to allow people to share content from your site using Google Buzz.

Post to Google Buzz

Configure the Buzz widget for your website or blog. Choose one of three different Google Buzz button styles. Select your preferred language.

The Google Buzz widget is only offered in a JavaScript version.  Google does not offer an HTML-only Buzz button. This is both inconvenient and puzzling. Why?

Many web sites and digital publishing platforms do not allow JavaScript due to security concerns. In fact, WordPress does not allow JavaScript on WordPress.com hosted blogs. The Google-owned Blogger blog product does allow limited use of JavaScript.

Yet Google Sites, the replacement for Google Groups, does not allow JavaScript. As a result, Google Sites users cannot include the Google Buzz widget on a Google Site!

Follow on Google Buzz

Allow users to follow you on Google Buzz without needing to leave your website. Promote your own Google Buzz account with the follow on Google Buzz widget and button for your website.

The Google Buzz API lets you syndicate Google Buzz posts, connect sites to Buzz, and more.  You do not need pre-approval to use the Google Buzz API or Google Buzz buttons or to promote the API functionality on your site using the provided buttons.

Google Buzz Branding Guidelines

Google has specific branding requirements that must be observed if developing an application using the Google Buzz API:

  • Give your application or website a unique name with unique branding and logos.
  • Include a disclaimer that your site is not affiliated with, sponsored by, or endorsed by Google Inc.
  • Do not use the Google Buzz logo or buttons as the most prominent element in the logo or icon for your application, nor as the most prominent element on your web page.
  • Do not include “Google Buzz” in the name of your application, domain name, website title or name.
  • Do not use the Google Buzz logo or buttons in a way that implies sponsorship, affiliation, or endorsement by Google.
  • Do not display the Google Buzz logo on any web site that has or displays adult content, promotes gambling, promotes violence, contains hate speech, involves the sale of tobacco or alcohol to persons under twenty-one years of age, violates other applicable laws or regulations or is otherwise objectionable.
November 5, 2010

Spam Fighting at Webmaster Central

How to identify web spam, via the Official Google Webmaster Central Blog

Webmaster Blog for Indexing and Crawling Sites

Today’s Webmaster Central Blog post gives the following as an example of a probable spam site.  Not surprisingly, it reads as “all gibberish”:

Gibberish site example

The post also includes information for submitting a compelling spam report. This is certainly important, in order that the report will be acted upon. In fact, Google’s criteria can be used as the basis for best practices guidelines for submitting spam reports in general, anywhere, not solely in the context of Google website-related spam reporting:

  • Submit the URLs of the pages where you see spam (not just the domain name).  This makes it easy for us to verify the problem on those specific pages.
  • Try to specify the issue as clearly as possible using the check boxes. Don’t just check every single box–such reports are less likely to be reviewed.
  • If only a part of the page uses spammy techniques, for example if it uses cloaking or has hidden text on an otherwise good page, provide a short explanation on how to look for the spam you’re seeing.
  • If you’re reporting a site for spammy backlinks rather than on-page content, mention that.

Google actually provides the following criteria for the type of website-level spam of greatest interest to them as an organization:

  • the cached version contains significantly different (often keyword-rich) content from the live version
  • you’re redirected to a completely different domain with off-topic, commercial content
  • the site is filled with auto-generated or keyword-stuffed content that seems to make no sense

These are just a few examples of techniques that might be potentially spammy, and which we would appreciate seeing in the form of a spam report.

Here’s Google’s evaluation and action procedure after reviewing these reports:

After reviewing the feedback from these reports (we want to confirm that the reported sites are actually spammy, not just sites that someone didn’t like), it may take a bit of time before we update our algorithms and a change is visible in the search results.

Keep in mind that sometimes our algorithms may already be treating those techniques appropriately; for instance, perhaps we’re already ignoring all the hidden text or the exchanged links that you have reported.

Submitting the same spam report multiple times is not necessary. Rest assured that we actively review spam reports and take appropriate actions, even if the changes are not immediately visible to you.

via Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: How to help Google identify web spam.

Tags: ,
November 4, 2010

Make your websites run faster


Google Development Blog Icon

Make your websites run faster, automatically!  Try

mod_pagespeed

for Apache.

October 27, 2010

Web Elements

Google Web Elements seems to be a collection of fifteen applications that enable Google products for display and use on personal websites. It is unclear if these applications are for Google Sites only, or Blogger too, as it is a Google property, or non-Google sites too.

via Google Web Elements.

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