Posts tagged ‘Google Research’

November 14, 2014

LOL targeted search

YouTube is something of a cesspool, with pockets of exceptional quality here and there. Even the higher quality videos have an ephemeral aspect, mysteriously vanishing or being marked Private, from one day to the next. Others succumb to the more prosaic, account suspended due to multiple copyright violations. Illegal uploads of major recording label artists abound, or did. YouTube is also becoming a go-to destination for low-fidelity live concert recordings.

There’s no shortage of fee-based alternatives, so I’m not complaining.

YouTube LOL search algorithm

Google Research developed an aLOLgorithm, “Quantifying comedy on YouTube: why the number of o’s in your LOL matter” to measure YouTube videos’ hilarity. Let’s just refer to it as the LOLgorithm, for my ease of typing. Initially, I thought it was a prior year’s April Fool’s Day post. It isn’t!

March 21, 2014

Google Research fan behavior

Friendly!

I found a broken link. It was important, being the contact URL on Google Research’s official Twitter account! I told them about it. Google Research wasn’t aloof! I was thrilled.

An invitation to join Google+

Google Research finally joined Google+ in August 2012.

Google Buzz chat

Inviting Google Research to Google+

I tried to coax an earlier arrival in July 2011. Click on the image if you would like to read our conversation. I remember feeling bold, and daring!

Odds and Ends

Indirect Content Privacy Surveys: Measuring Privacy Without Asking About It, Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS), 2011.
Abstract (an excerpt that I extracted from the abstract, that is):

The emotional aspect of privacy makes it difficult to evaluate privacy concern. This effect may be partly responsible for the dramatic privacy concern ratings coming from recent surveys, ratings that often seem to be at odds with user behavior…

This is SO true! Dramatically vocalized privacy concerns are highly inconsistent with actual user behavior! The gist of the article was to figure out a way to get at people’s privacy concerns without asking about privacy directly. Merely broaching the subject tends to cause survey respondents to get skittish, thus impacting their answers.

The article DOI, full text, is in this Google Research post.  If that doesn’t work, try the corresponding entry via Google Research’s profile on Google Buzz.