Posts tagged ‘machine learning’

September 3, 2011

Prediction API Part 2

Motivation

In my initial coverage of the Google Prediction API, I was very curious why Google would be so magnanimous as to open up this API for public use. This is a plausible answer from Google:

We do not describe the actual logic of the Prediction API in these documents, because that system is constantly being changed and improved. Therefore we can’t provide optimization tips that depend on specific implementations of our matching logic, which can change without notice.

An older version of a prediction API

Based on some of the user comments in the Google group for the Prediction API, I would guess that it is one of the more difficult of all Google APIs to understand and use. Similarly, it will probably be challenging to get meaningful results.

Requirements

Google advises that all the following are prerequisite for using the Prediction API:

  • an active Google Storage account
  • an APIs Console project with both the Google Prediction API and the Google Storage for Developers API activated

And of course, a Google account! See getting started for further details.

Free but not forever

Nor is the Prediction API free of charge indefinitely. According to the initial terms, usage is free for all users for the first six months, up to the following limits per project:

  • Predictions: 100 predictions/day
  • Hosted model predictions: Hosted models have a usage limit of 100 predictions/day/user across all models
  • Training: 5 MB trained/day
  • Streaming updates: 100 streaming updates/day
  • Lifetime cap: 20,000 predictions

This free quota expires at the end of the six month introductory period. The introductory periods begins the day that Google Prediction is activated for a project in the Google APIs console. Remember that charges associated with Google Storage must be included to figure total cost!

Presumably this is an API that Google won’t be deprecating without replacement any time soon. However, there is a separate Terms of Service for the Prediction API, which does give Google the right to do exactly that. I think that is standard language though, as Google is not contractually bound to support a free, or even paid but unprofitable service unless explicitly specifically stated.

Conclusion about the Prediction API

A great deal more information is available from the Prediction API developer guide including an example application for movie recommendations.

The Google Prediction API is probably best used as a sandbox. It may be helpful for deciding whether one wants to use machine learning for predictive purposes. If one decides to go ahead with this approach, there are probably more suitable alternatives than the Google Prediction API for an application intended for production use.

Advertisements
July 10, 2011

Prediction API

The recent release of the Google Prediction API Version 1.2 seemed oddly, well, magnanimous to me! Given the investment of intellectual capital and resources, I am surprised that Google would be so generous.  Allowing access to the Prediction API means that Google is giving access to its in-house machine learning algorithms to external users.

1939 Ford pick-up truck

1939 Ford pick-up truck will not likely use the Google Prediction API though other Ford products will

The official Google Code blog post, Every app a smart app, dated 27 April 2011, suggested many possible uses for the Prediction API. Some of the more interesting included:

The last item on the list has the potential, but not certainty, of causing serious privacy concerns. I’m guessing that customer feedback based on structured data is another potential use for the API.

I noticed that Ford Motor Company has plans for the Prediction API, specifically for commuters driving electric vehicles (EV). Apparently, there is a fair amount of “EV anxiety” due to limitation on range of travel. The Prediction API could be used to mitigate those concerns. AutoBlog is an online publication for automobile enthusiasts. It featured a great slide show demonstrating how Ford intends to make use of the Google Prediction API.

The Prediction API is available on Google Code. This is not the first release of the Prediction API. I’m uncertain whether versions before 1.2 were restricted in some way. (Google often grants API access to developers initially, and later, after ironing out any bugs or unexpected problems, opens the product to the public.)

Do be aware that a Google Storage account is required for access. Visit the Google API Console to get started.